SETI Talks

SETI Talks is a monthly public lecture series that showcases research relevant to astrobiology from prominent scientists, authors and experts from within the SETI Institute and beyond. Some recent topics featured include AI and space, Mars exploration, planetary protection, Cassini, ‘Oumuamua and the anthropocene.

SETI Talks are held at SRI International Headquarters in Menlo Park, CA, but they are also shared live, via Facebook, and recordings are posted to the SETI Talks YouTube channel

Kepler, K2, and Beyond: The Era of Exoplanets Has Arrived!

, 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
NASA’s Kepler space telescope was launched in 2009 and measured the brightness of 200,000 stars at unprecedented precision for over four years, with the prime mission goal of detecting Earth-sized exoplanets.

The Anthropocene: What Now?

, 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
The last officially recognized epoch on Earth, the Holocene, began at the end of the last ice age, about 12,000 years ago. Now, climate change, and in particular humanity’s impact on climate change, has led to the suggestion that we are already in a new epoch, the Anthropocene.

Cassini: A Look Back and a Fond Farewell

, 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Making Contact: Jill Tarter and the Search for ET

, 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
SETI Talks will return on Wednesday, July 12, with a program featuring Jill Tarter, Sarah Scoles, Elliot Gillum and more. 

A Journey to Alpha Centauri

, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
The Alpha Centauri star system is ideal to search for habitable planets by various observing techniques due to its proximity and wide range of stellar masses.

NASA's search for habitable planets and life beyond the solar system

, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Dr. Gary H. Blackwood earned his BS, MS and PHD in Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering from MIT.

Stellar occultations of planetary rings: from Palomar to Cassini

, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Chance observations of stars as they pass behind planets have provided some of our most valuable data on the structure of planetary ring systems, beginning with the discovery of the uranian rings with the Kuiper Airborne Observatory in 1977.

Search for extrasolar moons and rings using transit observations

, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Given the detection of several thousand extrasolar planets, a very interesting question is whether or not they have moons or rings. In the cases of extrasolar Jupiter analogs, the gas giant may not support life, but a moon could be suitable.

Latest Exoplanet Results from NASA's Kepler/K2 Mission

, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
The all-sky TESS mission will soon revolutionize our view of planets transiting the nearest, brightest stars to the Sun, just as the four-year survey by NASA's Kepler mission transformed our understanding of exoplanet demographics.

Origins of Structure in Planetary Systems

, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Observations confirm that planet formation is a ubiquitous process that produces a diversity of planetary systems.